To tell the truth, when friends suggested a journey to Azerbaijan I felt a mix of curiosity and surprise. I knew very little about this land overlooking the Caspian sea, rising between Europe and Asia, born from the fall of the Berlin wall which marked the end of the communist regime. Notwithstanding my initial uncertainty, the desire to take the opportunity to join my multi-cultural group of friends and explore a land that was still uncontaminated took over prejudice and uncertainty; once again the desire to get on the next adventure to explore new horizons won. So without too many expectations, I accept the invite to join my friends and we are on our way to Baku, it’s a warm dawn at the end of June. We departed from the international Dubai airport, trying to escape the Middle Eastern smothering heath to find solace in the continental chilly summer breeze. After filling up paperwork for the visa( For European, ultimately it is possible to apply online and pay 20 euros) we jump on a taxi in a London fashion just about outside the airport and we head towards our hostel in the center of the city. Baku looks extremely interesting since the very first glance, with the soviet accents recalling the old times on one side and the futuristic buildings on the other to showcase the strong economic growth taking place in this country.

Baku looks extremely interesting since the very first glance, with the soviet accents recalling the old times on one side and the futuristic buildings on the other to showcase the strong economic growth taking place in this country. 

The center of the city is mainly closed to traffic and it is extremely charming : restaurants, bars and stores are many in the center area while the F1 vehicles run through the streets of the dedicated area during the week end of the race. As we approach the old city, which is a UNESCO world heritage site, I am amazed by the charm of this place. Streets made in stones and tiny alleys make up the “puzzle” of this part of the city of Baku, with the castle and tower giving it a specially gorgeous look. In this amazing setting we sit to eat at a highly recommended tavern, Sehrli Tendir, the menu was packed with dishes from the Azeri tradition; pictures of famous people who dined here were hanging on the walls. The food was amazing and the lady chief at the entrance was all busy making the traditional bread using the traditional oven made in stone. Past and future blend in perfectly in Baku, from the old city we head towards the iconic skyline of the capital: the Flame towers. From the Dagustu Park, which you can reach using the cable way from the boulevard or the steps from down the valley, you may get a great view of the city in all its beauty: the blue of the Caspian sea and the flame towers lit by the light of the sunset as the sun disappears at the horizon. The journey continues and the next day we are ready for our road trip heading north, in the Caucasian region. As we leave Baku at our back, the green of the ills and the green of the sky take over, as we drive down the road indications to Quba can be seen. We finally reach the land of fire after a small deviation, a vast area where wells are set up and they are all busy extracting liquid gas, which is the principle source of income in this country; in this place a big flame fueled by gas has been burning off a rock for over 4000 years, this uncanny phenomena used to attract pilgrims all over the world, who traveled to this place to worship what they believed was a manifestation of divine strength.

We carry on with our trip to Quba, but before that we get lost in the real ghetto, made of tiny irregular alleys with no direction to take us anywhere, surrounded by the curious staring of local people.

We carry on with our trip to Quba, but before that we get lost in the real ghetto, made of tiny irregular alleys with no direction to take us anywhere, surrounded by the curious staring of local people. On the way to the north area of the country you may stop for a short break at the street food markets, located across the mosque at the bottom of a small hill. The scent of barbeque meat spreads in the air and no special recommendation is necessary to get to taste an amazing lamb kebab on the road. We are the only foreigners in the surroundings and people seem to be amused by just us being there; they don’t shy away from taking some pictures with us. While language diversity raises barriers a simple photography creates that common ground to establish a communication and create union. The road to Laza is purely gorgeous, luscious tree-lined pathways, rivers and grazing herd; notwithstanding the thick fog surrounding and covering the sight over the canyon, we decide to head towards the small secluded village amongst the valleys. On the side of the sign indicating the entrance into Laza two young boys seem to be awaiting the few travelers approaching this remote part of the world. They don’t speak English and carry small objects for sale. They take us to the village while the fog falls like a blanket on the little houses of this enchanted place surrounded by nothing but the silence of the mountains, with wild horses and small courtyards. We find a tiny convenience store selling also cigarettes and alcohol. The feeling we got was surreal, the village looked like it was stuck in the old times. I felt the simplicity of a life from the past with a history still to be written. The boys suggest we spend the night at the guesthouse of the village and, having had more time, it would have been a viable option however we had to be back on the road traveling to the opposite direction from Laza the next day, towards the village of Xinaliq, which is apparently the most densely populated village in Europe. Right after having breakfast with yogurt and fresh cheese, jam and coffee off we go to Xinaliq during a gorgeous summer day, with blue sky and clouds all beautifully coming together to create the stunning scenery unfolding in front of us. We make our way through the Caucasian region with breathtaking landscapes immerged into the green of the hills and snowy mountains rising far at its back. After around 3 hours journey from Quba, we reach Xinaliq, the small village characterized by tiny houses and shelters; it’s a magical atmosphere recalling the Hobbit County of the lord of the ring movie. The slow pace of daily life here is evident, women busy running errands with the kids who shy away from interacting with foreigners visiting their land. Photographically speaking the experience is fantastic, being able to capture fragments of a life that seems so far from your own reality in that spectacular context is priceless.. We meet Rosho, a native, who invites us to dine at his house for just few Lirams. We meet his wife and sister too and upon being granted permission I snatch a few shots of their kitchen, while they look at me with a shy yet amused glance.

We meet Rosho, a native, who invites us to dine at his house for just few Lirams. We meet his wife and sister too and upon being granted permission I snatch a few shots of their kitchen, while they look at me with a shy yet amused glance. 

The experience at Rosho’s house was Aziri hospitality at its best, a welcoming house with a table full of delicious treats: vegetables and super fresh cheese, lamb skewers and the irreplaceable yogurt. This was the perfect picture that defines the ideal situation for a traveler, being able to fully immerge in a different culture and local tradition. We finish up our lunch with a cup of black tea as people in this place normally do after a meal and Rosho invites us to go horse riding up and down the valley: magical. I am thrilled and accept the invite, in less than an hour here I am riding a horse for the very first time, exactly as I had pictured in my dreams: riding a horse on an immense stretch of land in the middle of a valley, with a brisk wind on my face and the growing thrill of happiness as I increase the speed of my ride. Simply an unforgettable moment I will cherish forever. We bid farewell to Rosho and his funny friends, we thank them dearly for the lovely day and get back on the road towards Baku; we only afford ourselves a few stops to take few unique and timeless shots. The unconventional journey, outside the box and away from the mass tourism destinations is what makes a journey memorable and unique in all sorts of ways. I need to admit that these 5 days spent in Azerbaijan have been thrilling; this country is still to be discovered and experienced to the fullest. To the next adventure…


Ad essere del tutto onesti, quando mi è stato proposto un viaggio in Azerbaijan, la mia reazione è stata un mix tra sorpresa e curiosità. Conoscevo pochissimo questa terra che si affaccia sul Mar Caspio, a metà tra Europa e Asia, nata in seguito al crollo del muro di Berlino, che sanciva la fine del comunismo. Tuttavia, l’opportunità di esplorare una terra ancora incontaminata in compagnia di un gruppo di amici da diverse parti del mondo, ha cancellato ogni forma di pregiudizio e limite mentale, confermando ancora una volta il desiderio di mettersi in viaggio alla scoperta di nuovi orizzonti. 
E cosi, senza molte pretese, accetto l’invito e parto alla volta di Baku in una calda alba di fine Giugno dall’aeroporto internazionale di Dubai, per scappare dal caldo torrido del Medio Oriente per rifugiarmi nella fresca brezza estiva continentale. 
Sbrigate le pratiche di Visto (per gli Europei, ultimamente è possibile applicare e pagare online, 20eu), saltiamo a bordo di uno dei taxi London style fuori dall’aeroporto e ci dirigiamo verso il nostro hostel nel centro della città. 
Sin da subito Baku si dimostra molto interessante, con i richiami sovietici d’un tempo da un lato e gli edifici dallo stile futuristico dall’altro,  a testimonianza di una città in forte crescita. 

Sin da subito Baku si dimostra molto interessante, con i richiami sovietici d’un tempo da un lato e gli edifici dallo stile futuristico dall’altro,  a testimonianza di una città in forte crescita. 

Il centro della città, principalmente pedonale e limitato al traffico, è un vero bijou; ristoranti, bar e negozi affollano il centro mentre si sentono sfrecciare le vetture di F1 nel circuito cittadino preparato ad hoc nel week end della gara.  
Giunti nella città vecchia, dichiarata dall’Unesco patrimonio dell’Umanità, vengo immediatamente rapito dal fascino e dalla bellezza del posto. Stradine in pietra e vicoletti strettissimi compongono il puzzle di questa parte di Baku, arricchita dal castello e dalla torre.
In questa splendida cornice, ci fermiamo a pranzare al Sehrli Tendir, taverna ultra raccomandata, ricca di piatti della profonda tradizione azera e con le foto in bella vista dei personaggi famosi che vi hanno presenziato.  Il cibo è eccezionale e la signora all’ingresso prepara il pane caldo nel tipico forno fatto in pietra. 
Passato e Futuro sono in armonia perfetta a Baku, e dalla città vecchia ci dirigiamo verso lo skyline icona della capitale: le Flame towers. Da Dagustu Park, dove ci si può arrivare con la funivia che parte dal boulevard, o semplicemente dalla scalinata lungo la stessa linea, si può ammirare Baku in tutta la sua bellezza: il blu del mar Caspio e le flame towers illuminate dalla luce del tramonto mentre il sole si perde oltre l’orizzonte. 
Il viaggio continua e il giorno successivo siamo pronti per il road trip in direzione Nord, nella regione Caucasica. Lasciata Baku alle spalle, il verde delle colline e l’azzurro del cielo guadagnano prepotentemente la scena, mentre per la strada si iniziano a leggere le prime indicazioni per Quba. 
Un breve deviazione ci porta nella terra del fuoco, una vasta area dal numero considerevole di trivelle impegnate costantemente nell’estrazione di gas liquido, principale forma di economia del Paese; in questo sito, una grande fiamma è alimentata dal gas che fuoriesce dalla roccia da oltre 4000 anni, una sorta di fenomeno misterioso che spingeva migliaia di pellegrini, nei secoli passati, all’adorazione di questo spettacolo naturale come una vera divinità. 
Proseguiamo il nostro trip verso Quba, non prima di esserci persi in un vero e proprio ghetto, dalle stradine sconnesse e prive di alcuna indicazione, circondati dallo sguardo curioso dei locali. Sulla strada verso nord è possibile fermarsi per un break in uno street food market, in direzione opposta ad una moschea ai piedi di una piccola montagnetta. Il profumo del bbq si disperde nell’aria e non servono ulteriori raccomandazioni per assaporare un ottimo kebab di agnello on the road. Siamo gli unici stranieri nei paraggi e la gente sembra divertita dalla nostra presenza e non si risparmiano per una foto in primo piano.  E dove le diverse lingue separano, ci pensa una semplice fotografia ad unire e a comunicare. 

Proseguiamo il nostro trip verso Quba, non prima di esserci persi in un vero e proprio ghetto, dalle stradine sconnesse e prive di alcuna indicazione, circondati dallo sguardo curioso dei locali. 


La strada per Laza è uno spettacolo puro, tra sentieri alberati, fiumi e greggi al pascolo; nonostante la fitta nebbia che avvolgeva le montagne e copriva la visuale nel Canyon, decidiamo di addentrarci fino al piccolo villaggio sperduto tra le valli. 
Accanto al cartello che sancisce l’ingresso a Laza, troviamo due ragazzini che sembrano in attesa dei pochi viaggiatori che si avventurano in questi luoghi disconnessi dal resto del mondo. 
Non parlano inglese e portano con se piccoli oggetti pronti per essere venduti.  Ci guidano dentro il villaggio quando la nebbia è ormai scesa sulle piccole casette di questo luogo incantato, avvolto nel silenzio delle montagne, tra cavalli selvaggi e piccoli orti coltivati. Troviamo un piccolo supermarket per i prodotti di prima necessità, oltre a sigarette e alcolici vari. La sensazione è surreale, la percezione di un viaggio indietro nel tempo di almeno 100 anni. La semplicità di una vita fa e un futuro ancora da scrivere. 
I ragazzini ci invitano a pernottare nella Guesthouse del villaggio e con piu tempo a disposizione sarebbe stata una valida opzione; tuttavia, il giorno seguente ci avrebbe visto nuovamente alla guida, in direzione opposta a Laza, verso il villaggio di Xinaliq, apparentemente il luogo abitato più alto d’Europa. 
Subito dopo aver fatto colazione a base di yogurt e formaggi freschi, marmellate e l’inevitabile caffe, ripartiamo alla volta di Xinaliq in una bellissima giornata estiva, con un cielo azzurro e nuvole rapide a comporre lo scenario di fronte a noi. Ci addentriamo nella regione Caucasica, con panorami mozzafiato immersi nel verde della valle e montagne innevate in lontananza. Dopo circa 3 ore di viaggio da Quba, giungiamo a Xinaliq, il piccolo villaggio fatte di casette e rifugi; un’atmosfera magica che ricorda a tratti quella del signore degli anelli nella contea degli hobbit. Il lento scorrere della vita quotidiana cattura immediatamente la mia attenzione, con le donne impegnate a portare avanti le faccende domestiche in compagnia dei bambini dallo sguardo timido alla vista di stranieri nella loro terra.  Fotograficamente parlando è un vero piacere, catturare attimi di vita cosi lontani dai nostri giorni in un contesto a dir poco spettacolare. 

Incontriamo Rosho, un uomo del posto, il quale per poche Liram ci invita a casa sua per il pranzo. Incontriamo sua moglie e la sorella e dopo aver chiesto gentilmente il permesso, rubo qualche scatto nella loro cucina, con lo sguardo divertito e timido delle due. 


Incontriamo Rosho, un uomo del posto, il quale per poche Liram ci invita a casa sua per il pranzo. Incontriamo sua moglie e la sorella e dopo aver chiesto gentilmente il permesso, rubo qualche scatto nella loro cucina, con lo sguardo divertito e timido delle due. 
L’ospitalità azera si presenta nella sua essenza, una casa accogliente e il tavolo pieno di prelibatezza: verdure e formaggi freschissimi, involtini di agnello e l’immancabile yogurt. 
Il quadro perfetto per la definizione di viaggiatore, immerso tra cultura e tradizione locale.  Concludiamo il pranzo con una tazza di black tea come solito da queste parte e Rosho ci invita a cavalcare il cavallo su e giu per la valle: un sogno. Non esito ad accettare l’invito immediatamente e in meno di un’ora mi ritrovo a cavalcare per la prima volta, esattamente nel modo in cui ho sempre sognato: in sella ad un cavallo in una distesa infinita nel bel mezzo della valle, con il vento fresco sul viso e il brivido della libertà man mano che prendo velocità. Semplicemente un momento unico, sensazionale, che ricorderò per sempre. 
Ci congediamo da Rosho e dai suoi simpatici amici, ringraziandoli per la splendida giornata regalataci e ci rimettiamo in viaggio per il ritorno verso Baku, concedendoci alcune soste qua e la sulla strada per scatti unici e senza tempo. 
Viaggiare in modo non convenzionale, fuori dagli schemi e lontano dai luoghi di massa è ciò che rende un viaggio davvero memorabile e unico nelle sue forme. E devo ammettere che questi cinque giorni passati in Azerbaijan sono stati emozionanti, in un luogo ancora tutto da scoprire e da vivere in prima persona. 

Alla prossima avventura…